1. After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immi

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1.  After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immigrants/undocumented people and the African American struggle for civil rights. Include (and correctly integrate/punctuate) one key quote and cite the page number (MLA form for internal citations). (10 points)

2. After watching the two videos that feature Charles Black, what is your reaction his perspective on the issue stated above and his collaboration with Freedom University? (5 points)

3. What foreign powers occupied Vietnam in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries?  Why did the U.S. briefly express the support for Ho Chi Minh and Vietnamese independence in 1945 and then declare war a decade later? (5 points)

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1. After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immi
Required Readings • “60 Voices: Charles Black and Dr. Laura Emiko Soltis on the fight for civil rights” https://www.atlantamagazine.com/news-culture-articles/60-voices-charles-black-and-dr-laura-emiko-soltis-on-the-fight-for-civil-rights/ • “The Atlanta Student Movement: A Look Back” https://www.atlantamagazine.com/civilrights/atlanta-student-movement/ • “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) • “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017) Videos • “Georgia’s Underground University for Undocumented Students” | The New Yorker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3NW5AOQQYw Interview with Morehouse alumnus Mr. Charles Black, civil rights activist Background of the Vietnam War https://scalar.usc.edu/works/the-vietnam-war/background-2?path=before-us-involvement Escalation of the War by LBJ Escalation of the Vietnam War by LBJ | PBS LearningMedia PBS resources (excerpts from Ken Burns series on the war) French colonialism in Vietnam: French Conquest of Indochina | The Vietnam War | PBS LearningMedia First Indochina War (1946-53); the Fall of Dien Bien Phu The First Indochina War: 1946-1954 (usc.edu) • “Apocalypse Now: Surfing and Napalm” [See suggestion on watching the film.] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmErYWQ5noc&t=226s Discussion 2 3. Immigrant Rights, Civil Rights, Human Rights / Websites on Vietnam (PBS and USC) (20 points) Answer the following questions in approximately 2-4 sentences for each question. 1.  After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immigrants/undocumented people and the African American struggle for civil rights. Include (and correctly integrate/punctuate) one key quote and cite the page number (MLA form for internal citations). (10 points)  2. After watching the two videos that feature Charles Black, what is your reaction his perspective on the issue stated above and his collaboration with Freedom University? (5 points)  3. What foreign powers occupied Vietnam in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries?  Why did the U.S. briefly express the support for Ho Chi Minh and Vietnamese independence in 1945 and then declare war a decade later? (5 points)
1. After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immi
What corrections or improvement do the following examples of student work require? THESIS STATEMENTS In Cristina Garcia’s novel, Dreaming In Cuban, the Cuban Revolution and the social government is seen as a new and improved way to prosper regarding financial success and racial redemption — amid the cruelties of the Batista era, in Celia’s eyes. In contrast, Lourdes perceives it as an unfair way of stealing a person’s accomplishments and allocating it to people who may not be so deserving. Both perspectives can be drawn from each characters upbringing and life experiences, perhaps explaining their total differences as Cuban women. In the novel D reaming in Cuban, Garcia portrays the characters — Celia and Lourdes — as opposites to provide the reader with contrasting perspectives to address both sides of the revolution. These contrasting perspectives created tension between the mother -daughter duo that left Pilar, Lourdes’s daughter, in the middle of it — forcing her to give allegiance to a side. References to the media of the era helped highlight the complete lives of Dreaming in Cuban’s characters. The influence of relevant political tension in Cuba gr eatly affects the impact of characters’ actions. Lourdes became a staunch capitalist opposed to her mother, who was a proud member of the revolution. The strained relationship between Celia and her daughter Lourdes affected their entire family tree. QUOT E USAGE She presents a metaphor saying “For me, the sea was a great comfort, Pilar. But it made my children restless. It exists now so we can call and wave from opposite shores.” (Garcia, ) In the metaphor the ocean represents her steadfast participation in the communist group El Lither and how it made her children for the most part uncomfortable but with distance set between them it will be easier to be cordial with each other whilst not compromising their own ideals. Celia’s stance with the communist party created a division amongst her children. On page 37 Celia writes in a letter to an ex flame, “A fish swims in my lung. Without you, what is there to celebrate?” The text says, “ Celia makes a decision. Ten years or twenty, whate ver she has left, she will devote to El Líder, give herself to his revolution. Now that Jorge is dead, she will volunteer for every project — vaccination campaigns, tutoring, the microbrigades” (Garcia 44).
1. After reading “Appeal for Human Rights” (Roselyn Pope, Atlanta Student Movement, 1960) and “New Appeal for Human Rights” (Freedom University, 2017), name two common factors in the struggle of immi
AN APPEAL FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (1960) Roselyn Pope [March 9, 1960, as preparation and explanation of the sit -in campaign they were about to launch, students organized the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights and ran the following appeal as a paid advertisement in three Atlanta daily newspapers. The sit-ins began 6 days later. ] We, the students of the six affiliated institutions forming the Atlanta University Center — Clark, Mo rehouse, Morris Brown, and Spelman Colleges, Atlanta University, and the Interdenominational Theological Center — have joined our hearts, minds, and bodies in the cause of gaining those rights which are inherently ours as of the human race and as citizens these United States. We pledge our unqualified support to those students in this nation who have recently been engaged in the significant movement to secure certain long -awaited rights and privileges. This protest, like the bus boycott in Montgomery, has s hocked many people throughout the world. Why. Because they had not quite realized the unanimity of spirit and purpose which motivates the thinking and action of the great majority of the Negro people. The students who instigate and participate in these sit -down protests are dissatisfied, not only with the existing conditions, but with the snail -like speed at which they are being ameliorated. Every normal being wants to walk the earth with dignity and abhors any and all proscriptions placed upon him because of race or color. In essence, this is the meaning of the sit -down protests that are sweeping this nation today. We do not intend to wait placidly for those which are already legally and morally ours to be meted out to us at a time. Today’s youth will not s it by submissively, while being denied all of the rights, privileges, and joys of life. We want to state clearly and unequivocally that we cannot tolerate in a nation professing democracy and among people professing democracy, and among people professing C hristianity, the discriminatory conditions under which the Negro is living today in Atlanta Georgia — supposedly one the most progressive cities in the South. Among the inequalities and injustices in Atlanta and in Georgia against which we protest, the fol lowing are outstanding examples: (1) EDUCATION In the Public School System, facilities for Negroes and whites are separate and unequal, Double sessions continue in about half of the Negro Public Schools, and many Negro children travel ten miles a day in or der to reach a school that will admit them. On the University level, the state will pay a Negro to attend a school out of state rather than admit him to the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, the Georgia Medical School, and other tax -supported public ins titutions. According to a recent publication, in the fiscal year 1958 a total of $31,632,057.18 was spent in the State institutions of higher education for white only. In the Negro State Colleges only $2,001,177.06 was spent. The publicly supported institu tions of higher education are inter -racial now, except that they deny admission to Negro Americans. (2) JOBS: Negroes are denied employment in the majority of city, state, and federal governmental jobs, except in the most menial capacities. (3) HOUSING: Wh ile Negroes constitute 32% of the population of Atlanta, they are forced to live within 16% of the area the city. Statistics also show that the bulk of the Negro population is still: a. locked into the more undesirable and overcrowded areas of the city; b. paying a proportionally higher percentage of income for rental and purchase of generally lower quality property; c. blocked by political and direct or indirect restrictions in its efforts to secure better housing. (4) VOTING: Contrary to statements made i n Congress by several Southern Senators, we know that in many counties in Georgia and other southern states, Negro college graduates are declared unqualified to vote and are not to register, (5) HOSPITALS: Compared with facilities for other people in Atlanta and Georgia, those for Negroes are unequal and totally inadequate. Reports show that Atlanta’s 14 general hospitals and 9 related institutions provide some 4,000 beds. Except for some 430 beds at Grady Hospital, Negroes are limited to the 250 beds in three private Negro hospitals. Some of the hospitals barring Negroes were built with federal funds. (6) MOVIES, CONCERTS, RESTAURANTS: Negroes are barred from most movies and segregated in the rest. Negroes must even sit in a segregated section of the M unicipal Auditorium. If a Negro is hungry, his hunger must wait until he comes to a “colored” restaurant, and even his thirst must await its quenching at a “colored” water fountain. (7) LAW ENFORCEMENT: There are grave inequalities in the area of law enfor cement. Too often, Negroes are maltreated by officers of the law. An insufficient number of Negroes is employed in the law -enforcing agencies. They are seldom, if ever promoted. Of 830 policemen in Atlanta only 35 are Negroes. We have briefly mentioned onl y a few situations in which we are discriminated against. We have understated rather than overstated the problems. These social evils are seriously plaguing Georgia, the South, the nation, and the world. WE HOLD THAT: (1) The practice of racial is not in k eeping with the ideals of Democracy and Christianity. (2) Racial segregation is robbing not only the segregated but the segregator of his human dignity. Furthermore, the propagation racial prejudice is unfair to the generations yet unborn. (3) In times of war, the Negro has fought and died for his country; yet he still has not been accorded first -class citizenship. (4) In spite of the fact that the Negro pays his share of taxes, he does not enjoy participation in city, county and state government at the lev el where laws are enacted. (5) The social, economic, and political progress of Georgia is retarded by segregation and prejudices. (6) America is fast losing the respect of other nations by the poor example which she sets the area of race relations. It is u nfortunate that Negro is being forced to fight, in any way, for what is due him and is freely accorded other Americans, It is unfortunate that even today some people should hold to the erroneous idea of racial despite the fact that the world is fast moving toward an integrated humanity. The time has come for the people of Atlanta and Georgia to take a good look at what is really happening in this country, and to stop believing those who tell us that everything is fine and equal, and that the Negro is happy satisfied. It is to be regretted that there are those who still refuse to recognize the over -riding supremacy of the Federal Law. Our churches which are ordained by God and claim to be the houses of all people, foster segregation of the races to the point of making Sunday the most segregated day of the week. We, the students of the Atlanta University Center, are driven by past and present events to assert our feelings to the citizens of Atlanta and to the world. We, therefore, call upon all people in author ity — State, County, and City officials; all leaders in civic life — ministers, teachers, and business men; and all people of good will to assort themselves and abolish these injustices. We must say in all candor that we plan to use every legal and non -vio lent means at our disposal to secure full citizenship rights as members of this great Democracy of ours. WILLIE MAYS President of Council For the Students of Atlanta University JAMES FELDER President of Student Government Association For the Students of Cl ark College MARION D. BENNETT President of Student Association For the Students of Interdenominational Theological Center DON CLARKE President of Student Body For the Students of Morehouse College MARY ANN SMITH Secretary of Student Government Association For the Students of Morris Brown College ROSLYN POPE President of Student Government Association For the Students of Spelman College Copyright © Webspinner: [email protected] (Labor donated)

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